Learning Change

Learning Change Project: 8 Blogs, +7300 Readings

Archive for June 11th, 2011

Youth participation and community change

leave a comment »

Read

Young people become empowered by their participation in the institutions and decisions that affect their lives–which in turn can lead to real positive change in the community. Youth Participation and Community Change presents leading authorities providing the latest research and effective approaches on how young people can be drawn to participate in organizations and communities. The diverse perspectives discuss youth participation in today’s society, the models and methods of its practice, the roles of youth and adults, and the future of youth participation and community in a diverse democracy. Approaches include those which promote participatory community-based research and evaluation, and involve youth groups in poor and racially segregated areas.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

June 11, 2011 at 11:17 pm

Revolutionizing education: Youth Participatory Action Research in motion

leave a comment »

Revolutionalizing Education makes extraordinarily unique contributions to the literature on young people by offering a broad framework for understanding a groundbreaking critical research methodlogy known as Youth-led Participatory Action Research. YPAR is a way to involve young people in defining the research questions and problems most relevant in their lives'”and more importantly in acting upon them. Many scholars have turned to YPAR a way to address both the political challenges and inherent power imbalances of conducting research with young people, while remaining sensitive to the methodological challenges of qualitative inquiry in recent years. This collection offers the first, definitive statement of YPAR as it relates to sites of education in particular, drawing on a unique combination of theory and practice, and bringing together student writings alongside those of major scholars in the field.

Read

Handbook of Social Justice in Education

leave a comment »

The Handbook of Social Justice in Education, a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the field, addresses, from multiple perspectives, education theory, research, and practice in historical and ideological context, with an emphasis on social movements for justice. Each of the nine sections explores a primary theme of social justice and education:

  1. Historical and Theoretical Perspectives
  2. International Perspectives on Social Justice in Education
  3. Race and Ethnicity, Language and Identity: Seeking Social Justice in Education
  4. Gender, Sexuality and Social Justice in Education
  5. Bodies, Disability and the Fight for Social Justice in Education
  6. Youth and Social Justice in Education
  7. Globalization: Local and World Issues in Education
  8. The Politics of Social Justice Meets Practice: Teacher Education and School Change
  9. Classrooms, Pedagogy, and Practicing Justice.

Timely and essential, this is a must-have volume for researchers, professionals, and students across the fields of educational foundations, multicultural/diversity education, educational policy, and curriculum and instruction.

Read

Twenty reasons why it’s kicking off in cyberspace

leave a comment »

Read

Read also: The Youth Crisis – Twenty reasons why it’s kicking off everywhere

In February the Newsnight economics editor Paul Mason very succinctly laid out the radically different nature of recent popular uprisings across North Africa, the Middle East and Europe compared to earlier political movements, and the economic and sociological reasons behind it. This incisive blogpost rang true for many of those involved in those social movements, articulating, as it did, a new sentiment and new political priorities amongst those populations. The short article sketched out a more cohesive image which the media in general was missing, partly through structural failings, but largely because events were unfolding at speed and trying to drag the chaotic events into an understandable analysis was difficult.

Running alongside the (still unfolding) Arab Spring, informing and shaping and being shaped in turn by those events, was a developing online conflict with major similarities; young, optimistic graduates who saw societies in more generalised terms of “power”, highly networked, informal and decentralised decision making processes and a deep cynicism and mistrust of traditional power elites and political ideologies. In the last month especially we’ve seen a series of events and developments that are changing the game of cyber-war (and cyber-class-war).

Written by Giorgio Bertini

June 11, 2011 at 1:59 pm

Student loan default trend compared to the subprime loan crisis

leave a comment »

Read

Read also:  Placing the Blame as Students Are Buried in Debt

For-profit colleges slammed by student loan repayment data

Student loan default is exploding and people are starting to wonder if the investment is worth the return. Hundreds of thousands of students are graduating from college this month heavily in debt. They are preparing to enter a U.S. economy saddled with a stubbornly high U.S. unemployment rate. Job creation  is stagnant. The jobs that are being created are unskilled, low-paying positions. Higher end jobs are disappearing as U.S. graduates compete with foreign workers willing to work for far less money. A lack of lending standards and naive borrowing for college has the student loan crisis being compared to the subprime loan crisis.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

June 11, 2011 at 1:40 pm

Posted in Student, Student loans

Tagged with ,

Global Employment Trends for Youth – on the impact of the global economic crisis on youth

leave a comment »

Read

View also: Highest Youth Unemployment Ever

The report presents the latest global and regional labour market trends for youth and specifically explores how the global economic crisis has exposed the vulnerabilities of young people around the world. In developed economies, the crisis has led to the highest youth unemployment rates on record, while in developing economies – where 90 per cent of the world’s youth live – the crisis threatens to exacerbates the challenges of rampant decent work deficits, adding to the number of young people who find themselves stuck in working poverty and thus prolonging the cycle of working poverty through at least another generation.

The Global Employment Trends for Youth, August 2010 remains unique, however, as the only report in the series to be written in the midst of a global economic crisis. As such, it inevitably addresses the impact of the crisis on young men and women around the world. The impact on young people is defined and placed in a broader context in terms of comparisons among regions, between sexes and among other age cohorts (namely, that of adults). Chapter 3 explores the question of whether young men and women, already defined as a group with serious vulnerabilities even at the best of times, can become even more vulnerable during times of economic shocks. It looks at where the crisis impact is being felt the hardest in terms of youth employment and unemployment and where the impact is showing up more indirectly in view of longer-term development prospects. Finally, Chapter 4 looks at some lessons learned from evaluated youth employment programmes. Ideally, such lessons can help to shape future developments as countries continue to prioritize youth in their national recovery policy agendas.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

June 11, 2011 at 1:23 pm

Esa sana costumbre de decir que NO

leave a comment »

Read

¿Y qué se supone que tienen de distintas estas revueltas con otros relatos de similar calibre como, por ejemplo, la Revolución Cubana, el Mayo Francés o la Primavera de Praga? Por empezar, su epicentro sísmico, que es en el último bastión dictatorial del mundo moderno (no existe región en el mundo con mayor promedio de regímenes totalitarios que en la árabe). Tampoco hay armas de fuste, ni cornamentas exhibidas con orgullo en las casas de los agitadores. Pero lo que marca la ruptura respecto de toda revuelta anterior no son estos datos sino que, esta vez, no hay Che Guevara, ni Daniel Cohn-Bendit, ni Jan Palach que asuman para sí el mérito individual de un proceso colectivo.

El protagonista real de estas protestas que vienen convulsionando el ombligo del mundo parece ser la indignación como factor nucleante de una masa de jóvenes efervescente, pero anónima, con la participación estelar de las redes sociales como verdaderas divas de una cartelera que hasta el momento la tenía arrumbada en el olvido. ¿Se imaginan lo que hubiese sucedido de haber existido Twitter o YouTube en tiempos de las revueltas en la Plaza Tiananmen de Beijing? ¿Cuánto hubiese tardado la multitud en volcarse a las calles luego de ver la imagen del chinito enfrentándose a una fila de cuatro tanques con tan sólo dos bolsas de fruta en la mano? Como reguero de pólvora, por blogs y grupos de Facebook comenzó a discurrir toda la información que los medios y los gobiernos hubiesen deseado ocultar para que, en la estima de la opinión pública, no se atraviese la débil barrera entre los que pueden ser un par de quilomberos aislados y una masa furibunda que está convencida de sí misma.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

June 11, 2011 at 12:25 pm

Jóvenes en Argentina – Sector dinámico, pero aún vulnerable

leave a comment »

Read

Desde el primer trimestre de 2003, el crecimiento del empleo entre los jóvenes fue del 124 por ciento, casi el doble de la tasa general (68 por ciento), pero el 18,9 por ciento continúa sin conseguir trabajo.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

June 11, 2011 at 12:04 pm

Posted in Youth

Tagged with ,

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 257 other followers