Learning Change

Learning Change Project: 8 Blogs, 6960 Readings

Archive for October 4th, 2011

Plebiscito Nacional por la Educación: Instructivo y materiales para participar

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Los días 7 y 8 de octubre, nuestro país vivirá una esperada fiesta ciudadana por la democracia y la participación social. Los ciudadanos y ciudadanas podremos participar activamente en el Plebiscito Nacional por la Educación, convocado por todos los actores movilizados y agrupados en la Mesa Social por la Educación. Este Plebiscito es una oportunidad para opinar sobre el sistema educacional que queremos y necesitamos para nuestros jóvenes y niños.

¿Cómo Participar?

Lo primero es informarse del Plebiscito y luego difundirlo, de todas las formas que se te ocurran, a amigos, compañeros de estudios, de trabajo, vecinos, familiares, etc., para que se sumen a la iniciativa.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 4, 2011 at 11:28 pm

Winner-take-all politics: how Washington made the rich richer-and turned its back on the middle class

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A groundbreaking work that identifies the real culprit behind one of the great economic crimes of our time–the growing inequality of incomes between the vast majority of Americans and the richest of the rich. We all know that the very rich have gotten a lot richer these past few decades while most Americans haven’t. In fact, the exorbitantly paid have continued to thrive during the current economic crisis, even as the rest of Americans have continued to fall behind. Why do the “have it- alls” have so much more? And how have they managed to restructure the economy to reap the lion’s share of the gains and shift the costs of their new economic playground downward, tearing new holes in the safety net and saddling all of us with increased debt and risk? Lots of so-called experts claim to have solved this great mystery, but no one has really gotten to the bottom of it–until now. In their lively and provocative Winner-Take-All Politics, renowned political scientists Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson demonstrate convincingly that the usual suspects–foreign trade and financial globalization, technological changes in the workplace, increased education at the top–are largely innocent of the charges against them. Instead, they indict an unlikely suspect and take us on an entertaining tour of the mountain of evidence against the culprit. The guilty party is American politics. Runaway inequality and the present economic crisis reflect what government has done to aid the rich and what it has not done to safeguard the interests of the middle class. The winner-take-all economy is primarily a result of winner-take-all politics.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 4, 2011 at 10:40 pm

Why the Rich Are Getting Richer

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Read also:  Winner-take-all politics: how Washington made the rich richer-and turned its back on the middle class

Increasing inequality in the United States has long been attributed to unstoppable market forces. In fact, as Jacob Hacker and Paul Pierson show, it is the direct result of congressional policies that have consciously — and sometimes inadvertently — skewed the playing field toward the rich.

The U.S. economy appears to be coming apart at the seams. Unemployment remains at nearly ten percent, the highest level in almost 30 years; foreclosures have forced millions of Americans out of their homes; and real incomes have fallen faster and further than at any time since the Great Depression. Many of those laid off fear that the jobs they have lost — the secure, often unionized, industrial jobs that provided wealth, security, and opportunity — will never return. They are probably right.

And yet a curious thing has happened in the midst of all this misery. The wealthiest Americans, among them presumably the very titans of global finance whose misadventures brought about the financial meltdown, got richer. And not just a little bit richer; a lot richer.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 4, 2011 at 10:31 pm

Posted in Rich, Wealth

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Occupy Wall Street (the theory) – is an open source protest

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This type of protest has been very effective over the last year in toppling regimes in north Africa. It’s proving relatively successful in the US too. Open source protest is an organizational technique. Probably the only organizational technique that can assemble a massive crowd in today’s multiplexed environment.

What’s the big picture?  Global guerrillas are getting better at building open source protests.  We are going to see more and they are likely to become a prominent feature of the geopolitical landscape.  It will also be interesting to see if open source protests could end up taking down a Too Big To Fail bank (i.e. Goldman) or a US President in the next 5 years.  That would be very cool to see.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 4, 2011 at 10:26 pm

The Fed’s $16 Trillion Bailouts Under-reported

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The media’s inscrutable brush-off of the Government Accounting Office’s recently released audit of the Federal Reserve has raised many questions about the Fed’s goings-on since the financial crisis began in 2008.

The audit of the Fed’s emergency lending programs was scarcely reported by mainstream media – albeit the results are undoubtedly newsworthy. It is the first audit of the Fed in United States history since its beginnings in 1913. The findings verify that over $16 trillion was allocated to corporations and banks internationally, purportedly for “financial assistance” during and after the 2008 fiscal crisis.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 4, 2011 at 9:39 pm

The Protests and the Metamovement

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Across the globe, protests are rippling out like vectors in an epidemic.

I believe that we’re witnessing the rise of a global Metamovement.

The Metamovement is a movement of movements. Not all these movements are similar, and no two are exactly like. The Arab Spring is part of the Metamovement; the London Riots were part of the Metamovement; India’s nationwide anti-corruption protests were part of the Metamovement, just like Israel’s massive demonstrations were; protests spreading across America, under the banner of Occupy Wall Street, are all part of the Metamovement.

Where did this virus erupt?

Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 4, 2011 at 8:02 pm

How Peer to Peer Communities will Change the World

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In reality, the term P2P refers, since a long time now, to the range of solutions, paradigms and approaches focusing on co-design (collaborative design) and co-creation, openness and freedom: that is, each decentralized, shared, distributed, equal mean to provide free and open solutions to common problems.

The long-term goal is to facilitate the emergence and consolidation of peer made communities to play a new role, a role that is traditionally a prerogative of companies and industries, according to the model of capitalistic production of goods and services.

The peer production model stands quite in opposition to neoliberalism. Open, equal and participatory platforms and paradigms, able to put people in direct contact with each other, shown tremendous potential during recent years: with the mission to help other p2p alternatives to emerge and consolidate, the “Foundation for P2P alternatives” was founded by Michel Bauwens years ago.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 4, 2011 at 6:36 pm

The Open Collaboration Encyclopedia

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The original and comprehensive open-sourced encyclopedia of collaborative models and networks. Filled with everything you every would need to know about the emerging open, non-hierarchical, participatory open collaboration paradigm – facilitation methodologies, community building strategies, collaborative principles, project management techniques, new organizational structures, and system theories. This book surveys the examples of this open collaboration paradigm like Burning Man, wikipedia, open source software, couchsurfing.com, community gardens, bike shares, Open Space Technology, the United Religion Initiative, citizen journalism, participatory urban planning, ecovillages and Iroquois gift economies. Prescient, timely and award-winning – it is a truly unique, delightful, and highly-informative reference book.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 4, 2011 at 6:05 pm

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