The Culture of Childhood: We’ve Almost Destroyed It

Children learn the most valuable lessons with other children, away from adults. I don’t want to trivialize the roles of adults in children’s lives, but, truth be told, we adults greatly exaggerate our roles in our theories and beliefs about how children develop.  We have this adult-centric view that we raise, socialize, and educate children. Certainly, we are important in children’s lives.  Children need us.  We feed, clothe, shelter, and comfort them.  We provide examples (not always so good) of what it’s like to be an adult.  But we don’t raise, socialize, or educate them.  They do all that for themselves, and in that process, they are far more likely to look to other children than to us adults as models.  If child psychologists were actually CHILD psychologists (children), theories of child development would be much less about parents and much more about peers.

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About Giorgio Bertini

Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++
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