Author Archives: Giorgio Bertini

About Giorgio Bertini

Director at Learning Change Project - Research on society, culture, art, neuroscience, cognition, critical thinking, intelligence, creativity, autopoiesis, self-organization, rhizomes, complexity, systems, networks, leadership, sustainability, thinkers, futures ++

Reciprocity an important component of prosocial behavior

While exchanging favors with others, humans tend to think in terms of tit-for-tat, an assumption easily extended to other animals. As a result, reciprocity is often viewed as a cognitive feat requiring memory, perhaps even calculation. But what if the … Continue reading

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Learning the language of music: is it child’s play?

The Italian Reggio Emilia approach is now considered the most progressive and desirable early-childhood educational approach in the world. These schools value children’s innate abilities and nurture artistic and creative intelligences through play-based emersion in the “poetic languages” such as … Continue reading

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Group learning makes children better decision-makers

Children who participate in collaborative group work to learn about significant social issues become better decision-makers than their peers who learn the same curriculum through teacher-led discussions, a new study finds. More than 760 fifth-grade students were involved in the … Continue reading

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Imagining dialogue can boost critical thinking

Examining an issue as a debate or dialogue between two sides helps people apply deeper, more sophisticated reasoning, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. “Envisioning opposing views leads to a … Continue reading

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How did we humans acquire our all-loving, unconditionally selfless moral conscience?

… clear evidence that we humans actually have cooperative and loving moral instincts, the ‘voice’ or expression of which is our conscience. As Charles Darwin recognized, ‘The moral sense perhaps affords the best and highest distinction between man and the … Continue reading

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The Emergence of Consensus

The origin of population-scale coordination has puzzled philosophers and scientists for centuries. Recently, game theory, evolutionary approaches and complex systems science have provided quantitative insights on the mechanisms of social consensus. However, the literature is vast and widely scattered across … Continue reading

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How Learning a second Language is good for your Brain

Over the past few years, you might have noticed a surfeit of articles covering current research on bilingualism. Some of them suggest that it sharpens the mind, while others are clearly intended to provoke more doubt than confidence, such as … Continue reading

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Genes Play a Role in Empathy

Researchers reveal our genes may play a role in how empathetic we are. The study reports genetic variants associated with low empathy may indicate a higher risk of autism. Empathy has two parts: the ability to recognize another person’s thoughts … Continue reading

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Human sense of fairness evolved to favor long-term cooperation

The human response to unfairness evolved in order to support long-term cooperation, according to a research team from Georgia State University and Emory University. Fairness is a social ideal that cannot be measured, so to understand the evolution of fairness … Continue reading

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Letting Kids Taste Alcohol May Lead to Drinking Problems in Late Adolescence

Researchers report allowing children to taste alcohol may lead to an increased risk of developing drinking problems during late adolescence. Parents who allow their young children to occasionally sip and taste alcohol may be contributing to an increased risk for … Continue reading

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