Category Archives: Cognition

Cognitive stigmergy: A study of emergence in small-group social networks

This paper proposes a model and theory of leadership emergence whereby (1) small social groups are modeled as small world networks and a betweeness metric is shown to be a property of networks with strong leadership, and (2) a theory … Continue reading

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Cognitive training can reduce the rate of cognitive aging

The neural mechanisms underlying the restorative effects of cognitive training on aging brains remain unclear. To address this issue, we examined the relationship between changes in spontaneous brain activity and cognitive performance that occur after cognitive training. Participants were older adults who … Continue reading

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Cognitive costs of decision-making strategies

Several theories of cognition distinguish between strategies that differ in the mental effort that their use requires. But how can the effort—or cognitive costs—associated with a strategy be conceptualized and measured? We propose an approach that decomposes the effort a … Continue reading

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On the relationship between emotion and cognition

The current view of brain organization supports the notion that there is a considerable degree of functional specialization and that many regions can be conceptualized as either ‘affective’ or ‘cognitive’. Popular examples are the amygdala in the domain of emotion and the … Continue reading

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Does speaking a second language really improve cognition?

The idea that learning to speak two languages is good for your brain has come to be widely accepted as fact, particularly in popular media. Studies have shown that bilingual speakers of all ages outperform monolinguals on certain cognitive performance … Continue reading

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On the role of stigmergy in cognition

Cognition in animals is produced by the self-organized activity of mutually entrained body and brain. Given that stigmergy plays a major role in self-organization of societies, we identify stigmergic behavior in cognitive systems, as a common mechanism ranging from brain … Continue reading

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Motivation, Emotion, and Cognition: Integrative Perspectives on Intellectual Functioning and Development

The central argument of this book is that cognition is not the whole story in understanding intellectual functioning and development. To account for inter-individual, intra-individual, and developmental variability in actual intellectual performance, it is necessary to treat cognition, emotion, and … Continue reading

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The Cultural Context of Cognition

This article employs evidence from a literature within social psychology on the malleability of scores on the Implicit Association Test (IAT), a measure that is widely used to assess implicit attitudes, and other implicit cognition measures, to provide a theoretical framework for … Continue reading

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Emotions Are Cognitive, Not Innate

Researchers propose emotions are cognitive states which occur as a result of conscious experiences, and not innately programmed into our brains. Emotions are not innately programmed into our brains, but, in fact, are cognitive states resulting from the gathering of … Continue reading

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The Case Against Reality

Cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman explains why human perceptions of an independent reality are all illusions. The professor of cognitive science argues that the world is nothing like the one we experience through our senses. As we go about our daily … Continue reading

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