Learning Change

Learning Change Project: 8 Blogs, 6960 Readings

Archive for the ‘Creativity’ Category

Arte Contemporânea liberta a Criatividade dos Alunos

Alunos concentrados, pintando, acionando seu repertório interior para criar não o que veem, mas o que sentem. Quem acompanha as aulas vê uma demonstração do que o poeta Manoel de Barros disse: “Crianças em pleno uso da poesia funcionam sem apertar o botão”. No meio do processo criativo, com frequência Maria da Paz identifica nas obras que as crianças estão produzindo uma semelhança com um artista contemporâneo. Ela corre e busca um livro na biblioteca. “Está vendo aqui? Está bem parecido com o que esse artista faz”. E é assim com desenho, pintura, instalação, pintura no rosto. As crianças conhecem por livros e vídeos os artistas e suas obras como Mondrian, Matisse, Picasso, Paul Klee, Kandinski, Antoni Tapiès, e os brasileiros Nuno Ramos e Karin Lambrecht , mas apenas como referência. Não copiam, cada um busca encontrar sua resposta, sua solução criativa para a obra.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 3, 2014 at 9:48 pm

Group Creativity – Innovation Through Collaboration

Even though there has been increasing awareness of the importance of social, cultural, contextual, and organizational factors in creativity, there has thus far been much less systematic focus on the group processes related to creativity. This is a serious deficit because increasingly, creative achievements require the collaboration of groups or teams . Fortunately, recently there have been a number of significant contributions relevant to an understanding of group creativity. We have brought these together in one volume to focus attention on this developing literature and its implication for theory and application. We have drawn contributions from a broad range of perspectives. The literature relevant to an understanding of group creativity has evolved along a number of different lines in different areas of study and disciplines. Researchers come from the diverse traditions of cognition, groups, creativity, information systems, and organizational psychology. Creativity and cognitive researchers have examined the role of social and cognitive influences on the creative process. Organizational researchers have examined team innovation, organizational learning, and knowledge transfer. Group researchers have studied group brainstorming, and information systems scholars have examined brainstorming by means of computers. Other group scholars have examined the role of minority influence on creativity and information exchange in groups. The contributions from these different fields will facilitate integration of the various findings and theoretical models into a general framework of group creativity.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 3, 2014 at 3:36 pm

Swarm Creativity with Collaborative Innovation Networks

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Swarm Creativity introduces a powerful new concept-Collaborative Innovation Networks, or COINs. Its aim is to make the concept of COINs as ubiquitous among business managers as any methodology to enhance quality and competitive advantage. The difference though is that COINs are nothing like other methodologies. A COIN is a cyberteam of self-motivated people with a collective vision, enabled by technology to collaborate in achieving a common goal–innovation-by sharing ideas, information, and work. It is no exaggeration to state that COINs are the most productive engines of innovation ever. COINs have been around for hundreds of years. Many of us have already been a part of one without knowing it. What makes COINs so relevant today, though is that the concept has reached its tipping point-thanks to the Internet and the World Wide Web. This book explores why COINS are so important to business success in the new century. It explains the traits that characterize COIN members and COIN behavior. It makes the case for why businesses ought to be rushing to uncover their COINs and nurture them, and provides tools for building organizations that are more creative, productive and efficient by applying principles of creative collaboration, knowledge sharing and social networking.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 3, 2014 at 2:15 pm

The Impact of Culture on Creativity

Culture is the general expression of humanity, the expression of its creativity. Culture is linked to meaning,  knowledge, talents, industries, civilisation and values. The objective of the study is to have a better understanding of the influence of culture on creativity, a motor of economic and social innovation. Does music, visual art, cinema and poetry for instance contribute to creativity as a way to stimulate job creation, economic prosperity, learning and social cohesion? What  is the impact of artistic creation on innovation?  Why do companies want to be associated with culture and art?  What is the social function of artistic and cultural creativity? The report develops the concept of culture-based creativity, stemming from art and cultural productions or activities which nurture innovation, and going beyond  artistic achievements or “creative content” feeding broadband networks, computers and consumer electronic equipments. This culture-based creativity is linked to the ability  of people, notably artists, to think imaginatively or metaphorically, to challenge the conventional, and to call on the symbolic and affective to communicate. The nature of culture-based creativity is closely linked to the nature of artistic contribution as expressed in art  or cultural productions. The spontaneous, intuitive, singular and human nature of cultural creation enriches society.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 29, 2014 at 5:15 pm

Posted in Creativity, Culture

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Critical Thinking and Creativity – An overview and comparison of the theories

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In this paper, I plan to review some of the scholarly literature about creativity and critical thinking, looking for commonalities between them. I also plan to compare the public trade books about creative thinking and explore how that thinking aligns with the research. Finally, I would like to explore if the relationships between them can strengthen my creative and critical thinking abilities. Both consider the thinking as processes rather than products or outcomes. Both involve the re-examination of existing information. It appears that creativity takes the next step after challenging assumptions and begins creating new ideas. Critical thinking challenges, but draws conclusions, rather than taking the concepts to new dimensions. Creative thinking is designed to create, and critical thinking is designed to analyze. It seems that creative thinking has aspects of critical thinking, and critical thinking has aspects of creativity. Like deBono’s thinking hats the process of looking at the alternative perspectives brings out the end result in both. Each has value, and when used in conjunction, creates a powerful process of higher order thinking.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 29, 2014 at 3:30 pm

A Critique of Creativity and Complexity – Deconstructing Clichés

In an increasingly complex world the natural human inclination is to oversimplify issues and problems to make them seem more comprehensible and less threatening. This tendency usually generates forms of dogmatism that diminish our ability to think creatively and to develop worthy talents. Fortunately, complexity theory is giving us ways to make sense of intricate, evolving phenomena. This book represents a broad, interdisciplinary application of complexity theory to a wide variety of phenomena in general education, STEM education, learner diversity and special education, social-emotional development, organizational leadership, urban planning, and the history of philosophy. The contributors provide nuanced analyses of the structures and dynamics of complex adaptive systems in these academic and professional fields.

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Creativity and Complexity in Cross Functional Teams

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Cross functional collaboration, when individuals attempt to integrate their diverse knowledge backgrounds into synergistic solutions, is the intersection of a complex set of factors researched in a variety of fields: psychology, management. social psychology, computer science, design, architecture, and many more.  Concepts such as team group, cohesiveness, cognitive complexity, group maturity, creativity, decision making, and many more interact and influence each other in very complex ways.  Like the Blind Men and the Elephant, these different people and fields have diverse, often conflicting perspectives and insights on the process.  It would seem useful if these diverse knowledge resources could be brought together in an integrated perspective on this phenomenon that would enable the different fields to build upon each other in the search for more useful knowledge.  This paper discusses some perspectives that may assist in bringing all the perspectives together into a shared discussion space that supports deliberate efforts to get more from cross functional efforts: defining creativity as insight, managing for complexity of thinking, and understanding team complexity.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 3, 2014 at 12:00 pm

The Organizational Context in Cultural Patterns of Creativity

In this article, we first review cross-cultural research, especially that concerning similarities and differences between East Asian and Western cultures, on creativity using laboratory tasks and tests. On the basis of this review, we then propose some directions for future cross-cultural research on creativity in the workplace. We emphasize the need to theorize why cultural differences make a difference in creativity and directly investigate, rather than assume, effects of contextual factors on creativity. In this regard, two literatures on creativity – cross-cultural studies using laboratory tasks and organizational studies of employee creativity – can benefit tremendously from integration. We also call for more empirical research examining effects of culture on creativity in the workplace, especially in China.

Our review of the cross-cultural creativity literature revealed that much of the research has taken an individual-centered, or individual differences approach to an understanding of levels of creativity in different cultures. Context has been almost completely missing from previous theorizing and research in the cross-cultural creativity literature. As a result of the decontextualized approach, the usefulness dimension of creativity has not been considered. Also, there has been little theorizing about the proximal social contexts that affect creative work, such as the workers’ relationships to supervisors, peers, and associates. This unsatisfactory state-of-affairs provides impetus for more and better theorizing and research in the cross-cultural creativity research area …

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

July 31, 2014 at 2:02 pm

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