Category Archives: Curiosity-based learning

Curiosity through Embracing Uncertainty

In the classroom, subjects are often presented as settled and complete. Teachers lecture students as if no further questioning is needed because all the answers have been found. In turn, students regurgitate what they’ve been told, confident they’ve learned all … Continue reading

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Curiosity: Care, Virtue and Pleasure in Uncovering the New

It is no longer controversial or suspicious to be curious. But, until recently, there has been little curiosity about curiosity itself. This has begun to change, with the publication of a series of books asking what curiosity is and why … Continue reading

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When teaching restrains Discovery

When the children finally got their hands on the toy, they were more likely to explore its other features if they had seen Bonawitz showing it to adults or playing with it herself. If she had talked to them directly … Continue reading

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Changing Education Paradigms

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Curiosity – A Link to Assessing Lifelong Learning

Read   Are colleges and universities placing graduates in the workforce whose functionality quickly diminishes, or are they developing graduates who continue to learn and upgrade their skills in accord with the evolution of their respective occupations? Curiosity likely is … Continue reading

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Teachers’ and Parents’ Conceptions of Children’s Curiosity and Exploration

Although curiosity is a characteristic often observed in young children, it has not received much academic interest in recent years. Among its many dimensions, the epistemic nature of curiosity, or the quest for knowledge, deserves attention. To explore the potential … Continue reading

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The Epistemic Value of Curiosity

Read   In this essay, Frederick Schmitt and Reza Lahroodi explore the value of curiosity for inquiry and knowledge. They defend an appetitive account of curiosity, viewing curiosity as a motivationally original desire to know that arises from having one’s … Continue reading

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Open Pandora’s Box – Curiosity and Imagination in the Classroom

Read   Much of the research done in the past 50 years has led us to view the child as overly rational, ready and eager to learn what grown-ups have to teach them, with little need for time and encouragement … Continue reading

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Curious?: Discover the Missing Ingredient to a Fulfilling Life

Curious?: Discover the Missing Ingredient to a Fulfilling Life   Brains lusting for the new/seeking a fulfilling life: I found a slew of concepts in Kashdan’s book to be especially interesting. Naturally the overlying theme is that that seeking a … Continue reading

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Case Study: Lewes New School pioneers curiosity-based learning

How do children learn? Is it through testing or open-ended class discussions aimed at piquing curiosity? Lewes New School, is spearheading a new approach to education. ‘Children learn to a huge extent by imitation – if we want our children … Continue reading

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