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Archive for the ‘Educational research’ Category

Innovating Pedagogy 2015

This series of reports explores new forms of teaching, learning and assessment for an interactive world,
to guide teachers and policy makers in productive innovation. This fourth report proposes ten innovations that are already in currency and are having an increasing effect on education. To produce it, a group of academics at the Institute of Educational Technology in The Open University collaborated with researchers from the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International. We proposed a long list of new educational terms, theories, and practices. We then pared these down to ten that have the potential to provoke major shifts in educational practice, particularly in post-school education. Lastly, we drew on published and unpublished writings to compile the ten sketches of new pedagogies that might transform education. These are summarised below in an approximate order of immediacy and timescale to widespread implementation.

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Read also: Innovating Pedagogy 2014

Written by Giorgio Bertini

January 29, 2016 at 12:14 pm

Ethics and Education Research

Part of the popular BERA/SAGE Research Methods in Education series, this is the first book to specifically focus on the ethics of Education research. Drawn from the authors’ experiences in the UK, Australia and mainland Europe and with contributions from across the globe, this clear and accessible book includes a wide range of examples. The authors show how to:

identify ethical issues which may arise with any research project
gain informed consent
provide information in the right way to participants
present and disseminate findings in line with ethical guidelines

All researchers, irrespective of whether they are postgraduate students, practising teachers or seasoned academics, will find this book extremely valuable for its rigorous and critical discussion of theory and its strong practical focus.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

December 9, 2015 at 12:01 pm

How Bourdieu bites back: Misrecognition in Education and Educational Research

Having noted that some use of Bourdieusian concepts in educational research is superficial, this paper offers a view of the distinctiveness of Bourdieu’s concepts via the example of misrecognition, which is differentiated from the concept with the same name in Fraser’s work. An account is given of a recent research project on white middle-class identity and school choice, which suggests that whilst parents avoided a common misrecognition (regarding school quality), they were nevertheless reliant on other forms of misrecognition (regarding the qualities of their children) that are equally important in the relationship between social class and educational inequalities. Finally, the paper suggests that educational understandings, including some educational research, are predisposed to misrecognise Bourdieusian concepts, and four areas of tension are identified. The paper argues against ‘light usage’ of Bourdieu whilst acknowledging that the approach can produce a pessimistic account that is at odds with some educational values.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 28, 2015 at 6:36 pm

Bakhtinian Pedagogy

This collection of essays brings Bakhtinian ideas into dialogue with educational practice across cultural and pedagogical boundaries. These encounters offer fresh perspectives on contemporary issues in education, and consider pedagogical responses that are framed within a dialogic imperative. The book also pioneers an important discussion about the place of the Bakhtin Circle in educational philosophy today. Drawing on the historical and contemporary scholarship that has already taken place in education to date, the book emphasizes the living nature of language as intentional acts that take place within learning relationships. Consideration is given to the wider contexts in which pedagogy takes place, and shifts the role of the teacher as expert transmitter of knowledge to dialogic partner in learning. Bakhtinian Pedagogy is particularly suitable for undergraduate and postgraduate teacher education courses that focus on pedagogical studies in early childhood, primary, secondary, and tertiary learning. It is also a suitable text for educational philosophy students at postgraduate level.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

March 31, 2015 at 12:18 pm

Education Systems in Historical, Cultural, and Sociological Perspectives

For nearly half a century, research on education systems has been increasingly popular. However, this popularity was long restricted primarily to internationally linked policy makers and education planners, often backed up by international organizations such the OECD but also by governmental or para-governmental organizations within the individual countries. These institutional affiliations provided education research with a specific character that often centres on notions such as excellence, efficiency, or standards. The specific comparative character of this policy-driven research agenda triggered the development of suitable research techniques such as comparative statistics and pertinent sub-disciplines such as cognitive psychology. Backed-up by powerful global institutions, this agenda purported to be rather unique, and it tended to ignore the cultural complexity of the educational field and those research approaches that address this complexity. This volume includes different historical, cultural, and sociological approaches to the education systems and to questions as to how research on education systems can be undertaken beyond the parameters of the existing research agenda. They demonstrate how pertinent problems of research on education systems can only be tackled taking an international and interdisciplinary approach with regard to both research questions and methods concerning education systems.

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Complexity and Educational Research – A critical reflection

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Judgements concerning proper or appropriate educational endeavour, methods of investigation and philosophising about education necessarily implicate perspectives, values, assumptions and beliefs. In recent years ideas from the complexity sciences have been utilised in many domains including psychology, economics, architecture, social science and education. This paper addresses questions concerning the appropriateness of utilising complexity science in educational research as well as issues relating to the ways in which complexity might be engaged. I suggest that, just like all human endeavour, approaches to research emerge out of discursive communities and can be understood as self-organising, dynamic and emergent over time. In this formulation, complexity represents one such newly emergent approach. I argue that it is important that researchers partake in critical and reflective discourse about the nature of education and conceptual frameworks, as well as about impacts and legacies of utilising complexity, so as to participate in and influence the ongoing emergence of educational endeavour. I conclude by suggesting a series of caveats for researchers considering using complexity in educational research.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 1, 2013 at 2:15 pm

Complexity Thinking and Methodology: The Potential of ‘Complex Case Study’ for Educational Research

Complexity theories have in common perspectives that challenge linear methodologies and views of causality.  In educational research, relatively little has been written explicitly exploring their implications for educational research methodology in general and case study in particular. In this paper, I offer a rationale for case study as a research approach that embodies complexity, and I explore the implications of a ‘complexity thinking’ stance for the conduct of case study research that distinguishes it from other approaches. A complexity theoretical framework rooted in the key concepts of emergence and complexity reduction, blended using a both/and logic, is used to develop the argument that case study enables the researcher to balance the open-ended, non-linear sensitivities of complexity thinking with the reduction in complexity, inherent in making methodological choices. The potential of this approach is illustrated using examples drawn from a complexity theoretical research study into curriculum change.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 30, 2013 at 12:34 pm

Normalizing Foucault? – A Rhizomatic Approach to Plateaus in Anglophone Educational Research

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In  a  recent  analysis  of  anglophone  scholarship, Baker and Heyning considered both where and when Foucault’s name was made to live and also analyzed the kinds of work such naming has performed,  i.e., the substantive claims made  in the name of or through Foucault. In  regard  to where and when, the most marked uptake of Foucault occurred in the second half of the 1990s  in  the humanities  and  social  sciences,  with  the  field  of  philosophy indexing  the  earliest  discussions  of  his  work.

Three predominant uses of Foucault in education appeared:

  1. historicization  and  philosophizing  projects  with  relativization  emphases  (a more “problematizing” Foucault).
  2. denaturalization  projects  without  overt  historical  emphases  and  with diversity emphases (a more “sociological” Foucault).
  3. critical  reconstruction  projects  with  solution  emphases  (a  more “administrative” Foucault).

This paper  takes off  from Baker and Heyning’s survey of anglophone uses of Foucault by examining substantive examples of such recombinatorial approaches  to Foucault  and  the  plateaus they serve.  It  will suggest  that specific responses to Foucault’s work at the turn of  the  twenty‐first  century are sustained in part by historical propensities in the field to a) scientize and template  theoretical frameworks, b) normalize‐govern particular approaches as standardized methodology amid swirling and recombinatorial  tendencies, and c) carve out moralistic dualisms around their utility.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 17, 2011 at 9:20 am

La economía como ciencia social

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Los planes de estudio en las principales facultades de Economía están siendo revisados. La crisis en las potencias mundiales cuestiona la corriente de pensamiento neoclásica, redefinida ortodoxa o neoliberal, predominante en esa carrera universitaria.

La crisis del paradigma neoliberal abre la oportunidad de dar un debate que una década atrás parecía imposible. La ortodoxia, como visión hegemónica, no es capaz de explicar el derrumbe de las economías centrales, ni ofrece soluciones viables. El análisis de esta crisis requiere comprender el proceso histórico, social y político que lo generó. A principios de los años ’70, el incremento de los costos productivos vinculados, en gran medida, a las demandas salariales de una clase obrera organizada y a la crisis del petróleo, provocó la caída de los niveles de rentabilidad de las grandes corporaciones de las naciones más desarrolladas del mundo. Como respuesta, los grupos de poder avanzaron con una estrategia de reducción de costos a través de la fragmentación del proceso productivo y de su relocalización, lo que derivó en una nueva división internacional del trabajo. Las naciones desarrolladas conservaron y promovieron las actividades de mayor alcance científico-tecnológico y, a través de los canales comerciales y financieros, lograron controlar las cadenas de valor globales. En el resto de la periferia, en general, se profundizó la explotación de los recursos naturales y se desmantelaron las jóvenes estructuras industriales, nacidas mayoritariamente en la primera fase de la Guerra Fría.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

September 26, 2011 at 5:47 am

Electronic education: Flipping the classroom

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Hopes that the internet can improve teaching may at last be bearing fruit.

TheE 12-year-olds filing into Courtney Cadwell’s classroom at Egan Junior High in Los Altos, a leafy suburb of Silicon Valley, each take a white MacBook from a trolley, log on to a website called KhanAcademy.org and begin doing maths exercises. They will not get a lecture from Ms Cadwell, because they have already viewed, at home, various lectures as video clips on KhanAcademy (given by Salman Khan, its founder). And Ms Cadwell, logged in as a “coach”, can see exactly who has watched which. This means that class time is now free for something else: one-on-one instruction by Ms Cadwell, or what used to be known as tutoring.

So Ms Cadwell, in her own web browser, pulls up a dashboard where KhanAcademy’s software presents, through the internet, the data the children are producing at that instant. She can view information for the entire class or any individual pupil. Just then she sees two fields, representing modules, turning from green to red, one for Andrea, the other for Asia. Ms Cadwell sees that Andrea is struggling with exponents, Asia with fractions. “Instead of having to guess where my students have gaps, I can see it, at that moment, and I walk over to that one student,” says Ms Cadwell, as she arrives at Asia’s chair.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

September 16, 2011 at 7:47 am

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