Learning Change

Learning Change Project: 8 Blogs, +7500 Readings

Archive for the ‘Networked society’ Category

Networlds – Networks and Philosophy from Experience to Meaning

Imagine the world, and everything in it, composed of networks. This book shows how it’s possible to see the world around us in precisely this way. Starting from everyday, lived experience, using accessible language, and requiring no prior knowledge of any specialized discipline in philosophy, science, technology, or beyond, this book will show how everything in the world can be seen as composed of networks of networks. This project, which I’ve come to call “the networkological project,” was sketched and contextualized in the short book called Networkologies: A Philosophy of Networks for a Hyperconnected Age – A Manifesto. While this early text provides a bird’s eye view of the project as a whole, it isn’t necessary to have read the Manifesto book first. While the Manifesto provides a bird’s eye view, this new text starts to get into the details of the networkological worldview, from the everyday world in which we find ourselves.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

December 5, 2015 at 1:55 pm

Privacy in a Digital, Networked World

This comprehensive textbook/reference presents a focused review of the state of the art in privacy research, encompassing such diverse topics as cloud computing, crowdsourcing platforms, vehicular ad-hoc networks, big data, mobile devices, location-based systems, smart grid technology, databases, social networks, healthcare, behavioral economics, and peer-to-peer networks. The first book of its kind designed specifically to cater to courses on privacy, this authoritative volume provides technical, legal, and ethical perspectives on privacy issues from a global selection of renowned experts. Topics and features: examines privacy issues relating to databases, P2P networks, big data technologies, social networks, and digital information networks; describes the challenges of addressing privacy concerns in various areas; reviews topics of privacy in electronic health systems, smart grid technology, vehicular ad-hoc networks, mobile devices, location-based systems, and crowdsourcing platforms; investigates approaches for protecting privacy in cloud applications; discusses the regulation of personal information disclosure and the privacy of individuals; presents the tools and the evidence to better understand consumers’ privacy behaviors. Offering invaluable support to undergraduate and graduate students, as well as instructors involved in courses on privacy, security and networking, this important work will also be of great interest to researchers and engineers working in the area of privacy.

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Networkologies: A Philosophy of Networks for a Hyperconnected Age

Networkologies is the first text to develop an entire new philosophy based upon networks. While many contemporary texts on networks have presented critiques or analyses of network formations in our world, this book is the first to develop an entirely new worldview based on the structure of networks themselves. From global capitalism to artificial minds, evolutionary biology to quantum physics, networks are our future. Networkologies presents us with a new image of thought for our hyperconnected age. The book draws on continental philosophy, complex systems theory and a range of other elements to both introduce and contextualise, as well as present, the networkology manifesto. The book explores what networks are, how they emerge, how they change and how they are resilient (or not). The book intervenes in the contemporary interest in networks and will thus be of interest beyond just the critical theoretical disciplines. The text is also part of a much broader networkological project, including an original iteration of the manifesto and several papers.

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Read also: Networkologies

Networkologies: A Manifesto – Networks and Philosophy

Written by Giorgio Bertini

October 11, 2015 at 12:44 pm

The Civic Organization and the Digital Citizen: Communicating Engagement in a Networked Age

The powerful potential of digital media to engage citizens in political actions has now crossed our news screens many times. But scholarly focus has tended to be on “networked,” anti-institutional forms of collective action, to the neglect of advocacy and service organizations. This book investigates the changing fortunes of the citizen-civil society relationship by exploring how social changes and innovations in communication technology are transforming the information expectations and preferences of many citizens, especially young citizens. In doing so, it is the first work to bring together theories of civic identity change with research on civic organizations. Specifically, it argues that a shift in “information styles” may help to explain the disjuncture felt by many young people when it comes to institutional participation and politics. The book theorizes two paradigms of information style: a dutiful style, which was rooted in the society, communication system and citizen norms of the modern era, and an actualizing style, which constitutes the set of information practices and expectations of the young citizens of late modernity for whom interactive digital media are the norm. Hypothesizing that civil society institutions have difficulty adapting to the norms and practices of the actualizing information style, two empirical studies apply the dutiful/actualizing framework to innovative content analyses of organizations’ online communications-on their websites, and through Facebook. Results demonstrate that with intriguing exceptions, most major civil society organizations use digital media more in line with dutiful information norms than actualizing ones: they tend to broadcast strategic messages to an audience of receivers, rather than encouraging participation or exchange among an active set of participants. The book concludes with a discussion of the tensions inherent in bureaucratic organizations trying to adapt to an actualizing information style, and recommendations for how they may more successfully do so.

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Networks of Outrage and Hope: Social Movements in the Internet Age

This book is an exploration of the new forms of social movements and protests that are erupting in the world today, from the Arab uprisings to the indignados movement in Spain, and the Occupy Wall Street movement in the US. While these and similar social movements differ in many important ways, there is one thing they share in common: they are all interwoven inextricably with the creation of autonomous communication networks supported by the Internet and wireless communication. In this timely and important book, Manuel Castells – the leading scholar of our contemporary networked society – examines the social, cultural and political roots of these new social movements, studies their innovative forms of self-organization, assesses the precise role of technology in the dynamics of the movements, suggests the reasons for the support they have found in large segments of society, and probes their capacity to induce political change by influencing people’s minds. Based on original fieldwork by the author and his collaborators as well as secondary sources, this book provides a path-breaking analysis of the new forms of social movements and offers an analytical template for advancing the debates triggered by them concerning the new forms of social change and political democracy in the global network society.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

December 11, 2013 at 11:17 am

The Autopoietic State: Communication and Democratic Potential in the Net

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The relationship between the practice of democracy and the use of new information technologies is dependent upon the technologies of communication and information, rules regarding the use of those technologies, and the nature of the entity making rules regarding those technologies. Since today developments in all three of these areas are turbulent, this article looks to social theory that deals with turbulence and chaos as a way of understanding the democratic potential in the qualitatively  different network society. The streams of literature drawn upon include second-order cybernetics and chaos theoryorganizational sociology, and the literature on the state. The concept of the autopoietic state is developed as a basis for determining appropriate communication policy principles for maximizing the democratic potential in the network environment.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 21, 2012 at 11:13 am

Networked: The New Social Operating System

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Daily life is connected life, its rhythms driven by endless email pings and responses, the chimes and beeps of continually arriving text messages, tweets and retweets, Facebook updates, pictures and videos to post and discuss. Our perpetual connectedness gives us endless opportunities to be part of the give-and-take of networking.

Some worry that this new environment makes us isolated and lonely. But in Networked, Lee Rainie and Barry Wellman show how the large, loosely knit social circles of networked individuals expand opportunities for learning, problem solving, decision making, and personal interaction. The new social operating system of “networked individualism” liberates us from the restrictions of tightly knit groups; it also requires us to develop networking skills and strategies, work on maintaining ties, and balance multiple overlapping networks. Rainie and Wellman outline the”triple revolution” that has brought on this transformation: the rise of social networking, the capacity of the Internet to empower individuals, and the always-on connectivity of mobile devices. Drawing on extensive evidence, they examine how the move to networked individualism has expanded personal relationships beyond households and neighborhoods; transformed work into less hierarchical, more team-driven enterprises; encouraged individuals to create and share content; and changed the way people obtain information. Rainie and Wellman guide us through the challenges and opportunities of living in the evolving world of networked individuals.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

September 24, 2012 at 12:16 pm

The meaning of network culture

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Whereas in postmodernism, being was left in a free-floating fabric of emotional intensities, in contemporary culture the existence of the self is affirmed through the network. Kazys Varnelis discusses what this means for the democratic public sphere.

Not all at once but rather slowly, in fits and starts, a new societal condition is emerging: network culture. As digital computing matures and meshes with increasingly mobile networking technology, society is also changing, undergoing a cultural shift. Just as modernism and postmodernism served as crucial heuristic devices in their day, studying network culture as a historical phenomenon allows us to better understand broader sociocultural trends and structures, to give duration and temporality to our own, ahistorical time.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

February 17, 2012 at 1:00 pm

The Power of Networks: Knowledge in an age of infinite interconnectedness

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Manuel Lima, senior UX design lead at Microsoft Bing, explores the power of network visualisation to help navigate our complex modern world.

Listen to the full audio: http://www.thersa.org/events/audio-and-past-events/2011/the-power-of-networks-knowledge­-in-an-age-of-infinite-interconnectedness

Written by Giorgio Bertini

January 5, 2012 at 6:57 pm

Networked Society ‘On the Brink’

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In On The Brink we discuss the past, present and future of connectivity with a mix of people including David Rowan, chief editor of Wired UK; Caterina Fake, founder of Flickr; and Eric Wahlforss, the co-founder of Soundcloud. Each of the interviewees discusses the emerging opportunities being enabled by technology as we enter the Networked Society. Concepts such as borderless opportunities and creativity, new open business models, and today’s ‘dumb society’ are brought up and discussed.

Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 12, 2011 at 1:02 pm

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