Category Archives: Shared intentionality

Let’s Dance Together: Synchrony, Shared Intentionality and Cooperation

Previous research has shown that the matching of rhythmic behaviour between individuals (synchrony) increases cooperation. Such synchrony is most noticeable in music, dance and collective rituals. As well as the matching of behaviour, such collective performances typically involve shared intentionality: … Continue reading

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The language of cooperation: shared intentionality and group membership

While we know that the degree to which humans are able to cooperate is unrivalled by other species, the variation humans actually display in their cooperative behaviour has yet to be fully explained. This may be because research based on … Continue reading

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Social play as joint action: A framework to study the evolution of shared intentionality as an interactional achievement

Social play has a complex, cooperative nature that requires substantial coordination. This has led researchers to use social games to study cognitive abilities like shared intentionality, the skill, and motivation to share goals and intentions with others during joint action. … Continue reading

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Brain-to-brain synchronization across two persons predicts mutual prosociality

People tend to be more prosocial after synchronizing behaviors with others, yet the underlying neural mechanisms are rarely known. In this study, participant dyads performed either a coordination task or an independence task, with their brain activations recorded via the … Continue reading

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