Learning Change

Learning Change Project: 8 Blogs, +7000 Readings

Posts Tagged ‘creativity

Creative Schools: The Grassroots Revolution That’s Transforming Education

Ken Robinson is one of the world’s most influential voices in education, and his 2006 TED Talk on the subject is the most viewed in the organization’s history. Now, the internationally recognized leader on creativity and human potential focuses on one of the most critical issues of our time: how to transform the nation’s troubled educational system. At a time when standardized testing businesses are raking in huge profits, when many schools are struggling, and students and educators everywhere are suffering under the strain, Robinson points the way forward. He argues for an end to our outmoded industrial educational system and proposes a highly personalized, organic approach that draws on today’s unprecedented technological and professional resources to engage all students, develop their love of learning, and enable them to face the real challenges of the twenty-first century. Filled with anecdotes, observations and recommendations from professionals on the front line of transformative education, case histories, and groundbreaking research—and written with Robinson’s trademark wit and engaging style—Creative Schools will inspire teachers, parents, and policy makers alike to rethink the real nature and purpose of education.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

April 24, 2015 at 12:05 pm

A Cultural and Systemic View of Distributed Creativity

This article discusses the limitations of the first generation of creativity-management technologies based on the psychological theories of intelligence and problem solving. The turn into a cultural and systemic conceptions in the psychology of creativity is analysed. It is argued that this psychology converges with the ideas developed in the sociology of knowledge, the history of technological systems, and activity theory as well as in innovation studies. All of them underline the significance of artefact-mediated communities, domains or practices. They agree on the importance of combining heterogeneous cultural resources and knowledge by horizontal networking across the boundaries of knowledge and activity domains. The internet-mediated new communities are discussed as emerging forms of distributed creation. A challenge for the management of creativity is to study and learn from the emerging problems, means and patterns of conduct of these communities.

A vital question in managing creativity is related to the mobilization of heterogeneous cultural resources within domains and across the boundaries of domains. This will take place in horizontal networks that cannot be managed in the ways characteristic of the market and hierarchical organization. The development of information technology, especially the Internet, is rapidly giving rise to new forms of distributed creation and new types of communities. This development is still in its early stage, and new technologies have unprecedented potential for novel uses and organizational forms. Therefore, it is vital to learn from the organizational principles and critical problems of the open developmental model and other forms of Internet-mediated activities.

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Collaborative Creativity: A Complex Systems Model with Distributed Affect

The study of creativity has received significant attention over the past century, with a recent increase in interest in collaborative, distributed creativity. We posit that creativity in distributed groups is fostered by software interfaces that specifically enable socio-emotional or affective communication. However, previous work on creativity and affect has primarily focused on the individual, while group creativity research has concentrated more on cognition rather than affect. In this paper we propose a new model for creativity in distributed groups, based on the theory of groups as complex systems, that includes affect as well as cognition and that explicitly calls out the interface between individuals as a key parameter of the model. We describe the model, the four stages of collaborative creativity and the causal dynamics in each stage, and demonstrate how affect and interface can facilitate the generation, selection, and amplification of ideas in the various stages of collaborative creativity. We then validate our model with data from three field sites. The data was collected from longitudinal studies of two distributed groups involved in producing creative products—astrophysicists studying supernovae and the expansion rate of the universe and children creating multimedia programming projects online—and interviews with staff in a multinational engineering company.

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Distributed Creativity: Thinking Outside the Box of the Creative Individual

This book challenges the standard view that creativity comes only from within an individual by arguing that creativity also exists ‘outside’ of the mind or more precisely, that the human mind extends through the means of action into the world. The notion of ‘distributed creativity’ is not commonly used within the literature and yet it has the potential to revolutionise the way we think about creativity, from how we define and measure it to what we can practically do to foster and develop creativity. Drawing on cultural psychology, ecological psychology and advances in cognitive science, this book offers a basic framework for the study of distributed creativity that considers three main dimensions of creative work: sociality, materiality and temporality. Starting from the premise that creativity is distributed between people, between people and objects and across time, the book reviews theories and empirical examples that help us unpack each of these dimensions and above all, articulate them into a novel and meaningful conception of creativity as a simultaneously psychological and socio-material process. The volume concludes by examining the practical implications in adopting this perspective on creativity.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

April 21, 2015 at 5:15 am

Nurturing Creativity in Young People

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This report offers: 1) A clear framework for the further development of creativity for children and young people; and, 2) A progression within this framework that starts with the Early Years, is embedded in (but goes beyond) mainstream education, develops a personalised approach, seeks to be inclusive of and responsive to the voice of children and young people and leads to pathways into Creative Industries. Key proposals:

1. Creative Portfolios – Develop a personal portfolio – a creative portfolio – incorporating both formal and informal learning.
2. Early Years – Ensure the visibility of creativity in the Early Learning goals and in the guidance for Children’s Centres.
3. Extended Schools – Set explicit expectations and incentives for creative activity in Extended Schools built on best practice in personalised learning.
4. Building Schools for the Future – Create spaces for creativity and community use.
5. Leading Creative Learning – Prepare new entrants to the education workforce for the roles involved in developing partnerships with creative organisations.
6. Practitioner Partnerships – Develop brokerage arrangements to build the capacity in education and creativity sectors.
7. Pathways to Creative Industries – Create a website to provide industry-approved careers advice and guidance.
8. Frameworks and Regulation – Encourage recognition of creativity through school self-evaluation and through including creativity as one of the themes for the national review programme.
9. The way forward – These proposals need further development. They will build on existing success and further nurture young creative talent.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

April 15, 2015 at 1:00 pm

Arte Contemporânea liberta a Criatividade dos Alunos

Alunos concentrados, pintando, acionando seu repertório interior para criar não o que veem, mas o que sentem. Quem acompanha as aulas vê uma demonstração do que o poeta Manoel de Barros disse: “Crianças em pleno uso da poesia funcionam sem apertar o botão”. No meio do processo criativo, com frequência Maria da Paz identifica nas obras que as crianças estão produzindo uma semelhança com um artista contemporâneo. Ela corre e busca um livro na biblioteca. “Está vendo aqui? Está bem parecido com o que esse artista faz”. E é assim com desenho, pintura, instalação, pintura no rosto. As crianças conhecem por livros e vídeos os artistas e suas obras como Mondrian, Matisse, Picasso, Paul Klee, Kandinski, Antoni Tapiès, e os brasileiros Nuno Ramos e Karin Lambrecht , mas apenas como referência. Não copiam, cada um busca encontrar sua resposta, sua solução criativa para a obra.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 3, 2014 at 9:48 pm

Group Creativity – Innovation Through Collaboration

Even though there has been increasing awareness of the importance of social, cultural, contextual, and organizational factors in creativity, there has thus far been much less systematic focus on the group processes related to creativity. This is a serious deficit because increasingly, creative achievements require the collaboration of groups or teams . Fortunately, recently there have been a number of significant contributions relevant to an understanding of group creativity. We have brought these together in one volume to focus attention on this developing literature and its implication for theory and application. We have drawn contributions from a broad range of perspectives. The literature relevant to an understanding of group creativity has evolved along a number of different lines in different areas of study and disciplines. Researchers come from the diverse traditions of cognition, groups, creativity, information systems, and organizational psychology. Creativity and cognitive researchers have examined the role of social and cognitive influences on the creative process. Organizational researchers have examined team innovation, organizational learning, and knowledge transfer. Group researchers have studied group brainstorming, and information systems scholars have examined brainstorming by means of computers. Other group scholars have examined the role of minority influence on creativity and information exchange in groups. The contributions from these different fields will facilitate integration of the various findings and theoretical models into a general framework of group creativity.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 3, 2014 at 3:36 pm

Swarm Creativity with Collaborative Innovation Networks

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Swarm Creativity introduces a powerful new concept-Collaborative Innovation Networks, or COINs. Its aim is to make the concept of COINs as ubiquitous among business managers as any methodology to enhance quality and competitive advantage. The difference though is that COINs are nothing like other methodologies. A COIN is a cyberteam of self-motivated people with a collective vision, enabled by technology to collaborate in achieving a common goal–innovation-by sharing ideas, information, and work. It is no exaggeration to state that COINs are the most productive engines of innovation ever. COINs have been around for hundreds of years. Many of us have already been a part of one without knowing it. What makes COINs so relevant today, though is that the concept has reached its tipping point-thanks to the Internet and the World Wide Web. This book explores why COINS are so important to business success in the new century. It explains the traits that characterize COIN members and COIN behavior. It makes the case for why businesses ought to be rushing to uncover their COINs and nurture them, and provides tools for building organizations that are more creative, productive and efficient by applying principles of creative collaboration, knowledge sharing and social networking.

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Written by Giorgio Bertini

November 3, 2014 at 2:15 pm

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